If this is you, go away

April 2, 2020

If you want to learn how to play the piano, you should stay focused on practical issues.

I tend to attract people who identify as having trauma in their past. They often get pissed off when they realize that I’m a jerk, not the kind and loving caretaker that they thought I was.

I also tend to attract people who think I’m an intellectual and who want to discuss philosophy with me. They get pissed off when I start making appeals to emotion and seemingly throw logic out the window.

Another group that seems to find its way to me are those who think I’m a nice guy who’s offering some quick tips on how to play the piano. They take off once they realize that they don’t understand a word I’m saying.

(If you fit into any of the above groups, please scroll to the bottom of this email and click the “unsubscribe” link.

Terms and Conditions: By clicking “unsubscribe”, you acknowledging that I have “won” our relationship, and that I have the right to brag about this in the future.)

To those of you who are still left:

Let’s talk about how to play the piano.

How to make it happen.

What to do when it’s not happening as expected.

What behaviors you are engaging in that are making it less likely that it will happen.

Why you have resistance to trying the behaviors that will make it more likely that it will happen.

How to learn to move your body.

How to learn to move your mind.

Those kinds of things.

About the author

Michael Korman has played the piano in opera productions and recitals, as well as directing music at a church and coaching classical singers. He draws upon his experiences with meditation and mindfulness to inform his views on music. In addition to music, Michael also holds degrees in computer science. When he's not playing the piano or meditating, he might be practicing drawing or calligraphy.

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